What is Eid all about?

What a time to be alive! We’re celebrating Eid-ul-Fitr at home amidst the global lockdown. I’m sure some of you are a little curious as to what Eid is actually about. As a follow-up to my previous post on the importance of Ramadan, I’d like briefly talk about why we celebrate Eid.

When is Eid?

There are two Eids that Muslims celebrate every lunar year, namely: Eid-ul-Fitr and Eid-ul-Adha. The former is a celebration of the end of Ramadan, whilst the latter is a sacrificial celebration during the period of Hajj (pilgrimage).

Considering the month of Ramadan has just passed, we’re now experiencing Eid-ul-Fitr. This begins with the sighting of the crescent moon, indicating the start of a new month (in the Hijri calendar).

That is why we’re often unsure of when Eid is exactly, having to wait till the evening to determine whether the moon can be sighted. If the moon isn’t spotted, then there’s usually 1 more day of fasting during Ramadan.

Why do we celebrate is Eid?

The Eid we’re celebrating today is known as the ‘The festival of breaking the fast’. After fasting for the entire month of Ramadan, the day of Eid is commemorated to celebrate the hard work, dedication and consistency of our spiritual practices.

It’s marking the end of a blessed month. It’s common for Eid to be celebrated for up to 3 days in Arab cultures and certain traditions.

How do we celebrate Eid?

Eid starts with a congregational prayer immediately after the sunrise. This is often accompanied by an Eid khutbah (sermon). We are encouraged to wear the best clothes we have and dress up for the occasion.

It is also a day of giving. We give gifts and money to each other. Congratulate one another and spread love and kindness. We also spend on charity and ensure that those who are less fortunate than us are also taken care off.

With the current lock down and restrictions in place, it’s difficult for us to experience the usual spirit of Eid. However, it shows that we ultimately have to live through our values and strive to adapt to our circumstances.

We have found new ways to be affectionate and caring. We have found new ways to contact and celebrate with our families and friends. We have so much to appreciate and to be thankful for. Alhamdulillah.

I know it must be difficult and heart-sore for many of you who are unable to experience this beautiful occasion with others. It’s all part of our journey and we need to stay and strong and patient.

“لا تحزن , ان الله معنا ”

I hope you all have a blessed day, even if it’s just at home. Eid Mubarak, may Allah accept from us and from you all of our good deeds.

عيد مبارك , تقبل الله منا و منكم صالح الاْعمال